Events

100 Years / 100 Women Conversation Series

The Met

Friday July 30

12:00pm – 1:00pm

Free, registration is not required

Join The Met and Park Avenue Armory for a series of conversations about the 100 Years | 100 Women project with the participants. The project invited one hundred artists, activists, scholars, students, and community leaders to respond to the centennial and complex legacy of the 19th Amendment, which gave some women the right to vote. Each conversation in this series features a group of participants exploring specific topics that resonate with the project, including uplifting underrepresented stories of women, art and disability advocacy, the past and future of women of color in film and television, and more.

One of The Met’s Civic Practice Partnership artists in residence, Toshi Reagon, participated in the project and is part of these conversations.

Art History From Home: Me, Myself and I 

The Whitney Museum, Online via Zoom

Tuesday August 3

6:00pm

Free with registration

This series of online talks by the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlights works in the Museum’s collection and current exhibitions to illuminate critical topics in American art from 1900 to the present. During each thirty-minute session, participants are invited to comment and ask questions through a moderated chat for a fifteen-minute Q&A following the talk. Sessions are available live only, Tuesdays at 6 pm and Thursdays at 12 pm, but topics and speakers do periodically repeat. Check back here for more sessions added regularly.

The old genre of self-portraiture has grown exponentially in our selfie-driven age. This session will explore how, from the seemingly isolated space of the home or studio, artists including Ana Mendieta, Paul Mpagi Sepuya, and Adrian Piper have used photographic self-portraiture to reflect on, perform, and expand our understanding of the self.

Josh Lubin-Levy is a Joan Tisch Senior Teaching Fellow at the Whitney and recently completed his Ph.D. in performance studies at NYU. For the past ten years, Lubin-Levy has worked as a dance dramaturg and performance curator, and is the editor-in-chief of the Movement Research Performance Journal. He currently teaches in the department of visual studies at the New School and at Wesleyan University.

Donavon Smallwood and Bryan Schutmaat on ‘Languor’ 

Aperture Conversations

Thursday August 5

7:00pm

Free with Registration

Join us for a special conversation between Aperture Portfolio Prize winners Donavon Smallwood (2021) and Bryan Schutmaat (2013) as they discuss Smallwood’s winning series Languor, meditative black-and-white photographs taken in New York’s Central Park, through which Smallwood envisions Black tranquility at the center of the urban landscape. Smallwood’s images, with their clarity and precision, invite viewers to consider Black people in natural settings connected to their own cultural history. As Smallwood himself affirms, “When you see Black people just being themselves, that’s what the art is.”

 The exhibition Donavon Smallwood: 2021 Aperture Portfolio Prize Winner is on view at Baxter St at the Camera Club of New York, July 21–August 25, 2021.

First Saturday Lite with John Edmonds

The Brooklyn Museum Plaza

Saturday August 7

2:00pm – 6:00pm

Outdoor is Free, Galleries need reserve tickets, $16

Artist John Edmonds hosts this month’s First Saturday Lite—a low-key, free outdoor afternoon amplifying culture and community in our borough—with a dynamic lineup celebrating the exuberance and artistry of the Caribbean diaspora. On the plaza, DJ Lovaboi kicks off the afternoon with soca accompanied by Michael the Pannist, and TYGAPAW offers a rich synthesis of Dancehall and Afrobeats. In our backyard Biergarten, catch a set from djFRiTZo and a special performance by harpist Brandee Younger presented by Carnegie Hall Citywide.

Participate in a photo booth designed by the artist to honor the closing of our special exhibition John Edmonds: A Sidelong Glance, plus get a signed copy of Edmonds’s monograph Higher. Throughout the day, shop and snack at the Brooklyn Pop-Up Market, which is spotlighting artists and vendors of the Caribbean diaspora.

Art History from Home: Art and Social Change

The Whitney Museum, Online via Zoom

Tuesday August 10

6:00pm

Free with registration

This series of online talks by the Whitney’s Joan Tisch Teaching Fellows highlights works in the Museum’s collection and current exhibitions to illuminate critical topics in American art from 1900 to the present. During each thirty-minute session, participants are invited to comment and ask questions through a moderated chat for a fifteen-minute Q&A following the talk. Sessions are available live only, Tuesdays at 6 pm and Thursdays at 12 pm, but topics and speakers do periodically repeat. Check back here for more sessions added regularly.

Art exists in relation to its particular social moment. Whether representing the current reality or leveraging its power to challenge cultural narratives, it can inspire emotional responses and critical thinking in a way distinct from traditional political methods. Through work in the Whitney’s collection, we will explore the different roles art has played in the United States during the twentieth century, addressing issues from immigration to economic justice to sexism and racism.

Ayanna Dozier is an artist, lecturer, curator, and scholar. She recently completed her Ph.D. in art history and communication studies at McGill University. She is the author of the 33 ⅓ book on Janet Jackson’s The Velvet Rope. She is currently a Joan Tisch Teaching Fellow at the Whitney and a lecturer in the department of communication and media studies at Fordham University.

100 Years / 100 Women Conversation Series

The Met

Friday August 13

12:00pm – 1:00pm

Free, registration is not required

Join The Met and Park Avenue Armory for a series of conversations about the 100 Years | 100 Women project with the participants. The project invited one hundred artists, activists, scholars, students, and community leaders to respond to the centennial and complex legacy of the 19th Amendment, which gave some women the right to vote. Each conversation in this series features a group of participants exploring specific topics that resonate with the project, including uplifting underrepresented stories of women, art and disability advocacy, the past and future of women of color in film and television, and more.

One of The Met’s Civic Practice Partnership artists in residence, Toshi Reagon, participated in the project and is part of these conversations.

Art History from Home: Dawoud Bey: An American Project 

The Whitney Museum, Online via Zoom

Thursday August 19

12:00pm

Free with registration

This series of online talks highlights works in the Museum’s collection and current exhibitions to illuminate critical topics in American art from 1900 to the present. During each thirty-minute session, participants are invited to comment and ask questions through a moderated chat for a fifteen-minute Q&A following the talk. Sessions are available live only, Tuesdays at 6 pm and Thursdays at 12 pm, but topics and speakers do periodically repeat. Check back here for more sessions added regularly.

This session explores the work of photographer Dawoud Bey, who uses his camera to visualize communities and histories that have been underrepresented. From his tender and perceptive portraits to more recent work that takes a historic turn, Bey’s images pose existential questions that suggest not just a kind of personal expression but the power and possibility of bearing witness through photography.

Josh Lubin-Levy is a Joan Tisch Senior Teaching Fellow at the Whitney and recently completed his Ph.D. in performance studies at NYU. For the past ten years, Lubin-Levy has worked as a dance dramaturg and performance curator, and is the editor-in-chief of the Movement Research Performance Journal. He currently teaches in the department of visual studies at the New School and at Wesleyan University.